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Minnesota Injury Facts, 2009-2010 Edition: Traffic

Traffic injuries and deaths in 2009
Traffic deaths dropped 7.5 percent on Minnesota’s roads in 2009, to 421, the lowest toll on record since 1944. In addition to the 421 killed, 31,074 were injured.

The state recorded a new all-time low in the number of alcohol-related traffic deaths (141). However, alcohol-related crashes still accounted for 34 percent of all fatalities, similar to previous years. Motorcycle crashes resulted in 53 deaths — a 26 percent drop from the 72 deaths in 2008, which was a 24-year high.

Just 129 of the 302 vehicle occupants killed were wearing seat belts; 50 percent of unbelted persons who died were ejected from the vehicle.

The death rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT) was (0.74) — among the lowest in the nation. Minnesota’s seat belt use rate reached an all-time high of 90 percent in 2009, compared to the national rate of 84 percent. In October 2010 it reached 92 percent.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety cited several factors in the decline, including the new primary seat belt law, heightened enforcement efforts, road engineering improvements and the economy.

Source: Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety

More information about traffic crashes in Minnesota available from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety at http://www.dps.state.mn.us/ots/crashdata/crash_facts.asp.

Minnesota Traffic Deaths in 2008

Traffic injuries, U.S.

  • National Center for Statistics and Analysis, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, U.S. DOT, http://www.nhtsa.gov/NCSA


  • Additional Pages
    Minnesota Injury Facts, 2009-2010 Homepage

    Fatal injuries, Minnesota
    All injuries, U.S.
  • Centers for Disease Control, http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/duip/duip.htm


  • Workplace injuries, Minnesota
    Workplace injuries, U.S.
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, http://www.bls.gov/bls/safety.htm
  • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2004-146/


  • Injuries in the home, Minnesota
    Injuries in the home, U.S.
  • Consumer Product Safety Commission, http://www.cpsc.gov/LIBRARY/data.html


  • Recreational injuries, Minnesota
    Recreational injuries, U.S.
  • Consumer Product Safety Commission, http://www.cpsc.gov/LIBRARY/data.html


  • Minnesota injuries by age
  • Minnesota Injury Facts, Ages 1-19
  • Minnesota Injury Facts, Ages 20-39
  • Minnesota Injury Facts, Ages 40-59
  • Minnesota Injury Facts, Ages 60-85+

  • Minnesota Department of Health:
  • Emergency Department-treated Traumatic Brain Injury, Minnesota 1998 - 2003 (PDF, 708 KB, 28 pages)
  • Nonfatal Hospitalized Traumatic Brain Injury, Minnesota 1998 - 2003 (PDF, 241 KB, 28 pages)
  • Ten Leading Causes of Nonfatal Hospitalized Injury by Age Group, Minnesota 1998-2001
  • Ten Leading Causes of Nonfatal ED-treated Injury by Age Group, Minnesota 1998-2001


  • Minnesota injuries by gender Minnesota injuries by costs
  • Minnesota Department of Health, http://www.health.state.mn.us/injury/pub/ed2001/index.cfm (see "Impact")
  • Minnesota Department of Public Safety, http://www.dps.state.mn.us/ots/crashdata/codes_project.asp


  • Prevention recommendations